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FINDINGS OF CASE STUDIES IN ENTERPRISE SYSTEMS ENGINEERING

[document] Submitted on 18 July, 2019 - 06:22
Keywords FINDINGS OF CASE STUDIES IN ENTERPRISE SYSTEMS ENGINEERING Enterprise Systems Engineering Enterprise Management Case Studies.
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In terms of general findings, there was agreement across most of the case studies that the ESE processes described here were very useful in guiding the steps involved in enterprise level engineering. It was also noted, however, that
many of the studies did not use the processes completely or sequentially, but rather pulled from them as needs arose. An additional process for Stakeholder Analysis also proved very useful on a number of programs reviewed in the studies and in other cases, its absence proved detrimental to the engineering effort overall—highlighting the need for yet a sixth ESE process.

A number of other common findings related to the important utility of up-front capabilities-based engineering, engineering architecture and the important role of integrating technology planning into a program’s business processes to ensure successful enterprise. There was agreement throughout the study effort that enlightened systems engineering must account for social, cultural and economic variables if it is to be successful. This result has broad implications for systems engineering theory, practice and education. A more detailed summary
of these and other findings is provided below.

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Abstract

The systems engineering community is increasingly facing challenges of engineering enterprises that consist of many interrelated systems without a single hierarchical control authority. Although there are technical papers describing such complex
adaptive systems as well as some early papers contributing to the theory of systems engineering of enterprises, there is no generally accepted theory or set of best practices. This paper presents the findings from over a dozen case studies in enterprise systems engineering conducted at the MITRE Corporation during 2005 and 2006. The projects studied were related to the US Air Force's Command and Control (C2) enterprise which is being engineered through many different programs by different contractors for
different immediate customers - yet is expected to work as an integrated C2 enterprise. However, the findings presented are applicable to any net-centric enterprise with multiple users, operators and stakeholders.

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